Necrophilia in Ancient Egypt

Possibly the only thing that has remained unchanged throughout our history is human nature. The dark recesses of the human brain have continually goaded a few to seek goals that repulse most of us. Time and again a few who walk and breathe among us have allowed their perversion to reach beyond the grave and indulged in necrophilia.

Instances of necrophilia abound in the modern world, and while most cases aren’t discussed openly, a few have made the world sit up and take notice. The possible desecration of Eva Peron’s corpse by one or more officers who were supposed to guard her embalmed body, had attracted the attention of the whole world to the case. Thirty-two-year old Eva Peron was the wife of Argentina’s then President Juan Peron, when she had died of cervical cancer in 1952, and was embalmed on the request of her husband.

Lesser known Instances of Necrophilia  can be found in the historical records from the nineteenth century, where some men of noble birth were found to be necrophiles. Evidence of Necrophilia has been found around the world and throughout history, including in Ancient Egypt.

And yet, what makes Ancient Egypt different is the way not only necrophilia but rape and incest too is Continue reading “Necrophilia in Ancient Egypt”

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Why Akhenaten became a Heretic?

I love the once-upon-a-time beginnings. They make dystopias appear utopian, so…

Once upon a time, there was a young prince, who co-ruled Egypt with his father. The young prince then became Pharaoh. However, this Pharaoh was unlike any other previous pharaoh. While his predecessors had accepted the supremacy of the priesthood of Amun, he decided to defy them.

His defiance was unique. He did something that had probably never crossed the mind of anyone until then.

Continue reading “Why Akhenaten became a Heretic?”

Tutankhamun, Ay, and the Spinner of Dreams.

The heretic king Akhenaten and his beautiful wife Nefertiti had many daughters but no son, and while a daughter was the vessel that carried the royal blood, she couldn’t be the ruler of Egypt. Though, in past, some walls were etched with the stories of Queen Hatshepsut, the woman-king who wore a false beard and ruled, everyone knew that by strapping that false beard to her chin, she had committed a crime against the gods, and Akhenaten was sure that his new and only god Aten wouldn’t be happy if one of his daughters had to wear the double crown upon her brow.

So when one of the lesser wives of Akhenaten finally gave birth to a son, everyone rejoiced, but their joy was pathetically short-lived, as they soon realized that the young prince was born with deformities that wouldn’t let him live a full life, let alone a long one. Continue reading “Tutankhamun, Ay, and the Spinner of Dreams.”

Yonder Worlds?

Yonder worlds are worlds that are far away – apparently beyond our reach. Buried beneath the sands of time, hidden behind the veil of mystery, these worlds reveal themselves to us through our imagination.

Yonder Worlds are worlds that call me. They torture my imagination and demand that I etch them on paper. These are worlds that are ancient, future, or imaginary.

Through this blog, I hope to share my glimpses of these worlds. I cannot say which worlds would beckon me in future, but for now Ancient Egypt has me in its thralls.

Who am I? 

I am just a storyteller on a journey of imagination.

Image Credits:
Nefertiti’s Bust in Berlin Museum.
By Rüdiger Stehn from Kiel, Deutschland [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons)

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